Le code source d’I2P est conservé sur plusieurs dépôts Monotone. Consultez le site web de Monotone pour obtenir des renseignements sur Monotone. Consultez cette article de forum au sujet d’i2p monotone pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements sur la façon de débuter et de vérifier la source anonymement. Un guide de démarrage se trouve aussi sur la page du nouveau développeur.

If you want to get the source non-anonymously, pull from the public server mtn.welterde.de. The i2p source code branch is "i2p.i2p".

Guide

The following is a detailed guide by Complication.

  
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

1. Why transition
==================

The disappearance of dev.i2p.net taught us a lesson.
Switching to Monotone should avoid it happening again.



2. Why pick Monotone
=====================

* Syndie was already using Monotone.
* I knew a little bit about it (not enough).
* Zzz and Welterde experienced some issues with Bazaar.
* Sponge advised against Git.



3. What Monotone is
====================

Monotone is a distributed version control system,
with cryptographic authentication and access control.
It is fairly small, has few dependencies, and keeps projects
in a compressed SQLite database.

By previous work on Syndie, it had been confirmed
that Monotone would work over I2P (it can resume syncs
cleanly from where the previous attempt broke).



4. What this document covers
=============================

5. Operating a client:

5.1. Generating keys for using Monotone
5.2. About trust, and initializing your Monotone repository
5.3. Obtaining and deploying developers' commit keys
5.3.1. Monotone keys for Complication
5.3.2. Monotone keys for zzz
5.3.3. Monotone keys for welterde
5.3.4. Monotone keys for jrandom
5.4. Setting up trust evaluation hooks
5.5. About servers, and creating a client tunnel to "mtn.i2p2.i2p"
5.6. Pulling the "i2p.i2p", "i2p.www" and "i2p.syndie" branches
5.7. Verifying that trust evaluation works
5.8. Verifying that I2P maintains continuity with jrandom's last tarball
5.8.1. Obtaining jrandom's public GPG key
5.8.2. Obtaining the 0.6.1.30 source tarball and jrandom's signature of it
5.8.3. Verifying and extracting the source tarball
5.8.4. Checking out 0.6.1.30 sources from Monotone
5.8.5. Diffing source trees against each other
5.8.6. Examining changes from 0.6.1.30 onwards
5.9. Checking out a working copy of the latest version
5.10. Updating your working copy to the latest version
5.11. Why "i2p.www" cannot be verified
5.12. Why Syndie doesn't need a signed tarball to verify

6. Operating a server:

6.1. Obtaining and deploying developers' transport keys
6.2. Regulating push and pull access on a server
6.3. Running Monotone in server mode
6.4. Differences under Debian GNU/Linux



5.1. Generating keys for using Monotone
========================================

To pull (download), push (upload) or sync (both ways)
source code using Monotone, you need to have a transport key.
A transport key authenticates your computer to a repository server,
so it can grant you read or write access.

To commit code into Monotone (authenticate your code
as originating from you), you are strongly recommended
to use a separate key: a commit key.

If you don't want to generate any keys, you can get away with it.
Public repositories generally provide read access to anyone,
and Monotone will automatically generate temporary keys
when you pull code from a repository without specifying a key.
However, operating without either key will place limitations
on your activities.

Without a transport key, you cannot:

* pull code from a server which doesn't allow global read access
* push code to any server
* run Monotone as a server

Without a commit key, you cannot:

* commit any code

If you are certain that you will not be doing any of that,
you can skip generating keys, and proceed to section 5.2.
If you want to generate keys, read the following.

By convention, keys are named like an e-mail addresses.
A corresponding e-mail address does not need to exist.
For example, your keys might be named:

complication@mail.i2p
complication-transport@mail.i2p

Monotone stores keys under "/home/username/.monotone/keys",
in text files which are named identically to the keys,
for example:

/home/complication/.monotone/keys/complication@mail.i2p

To generate a tranport key, and optionally also a commit key,
issue in any directory commands like the following:

mtn genkey yourname-transport@someplace
mtn genkey yourname@someplace

While creating keys, Monotone will prompt you for a passphrase
to protect your keys against unauthorized use by encrypting them.
It is very strongly recommended to protect a commit key.
You may want to skip passphrase-protecting a transport key
if you run Monotone in server mode, and require capability
for automatic restarts.



5.2. About trust, and initializing your Monotone repository
============================================================

MONOTONE HELPS ENSURE THAT NOBODY CAN EASILY
IMPERSONATE A DEVELOPER WITHOUT OTHERS NOTICING.
SINCE DEVELOPERS MAKE MISTAKES AND CAN BE COMPROMISED,
NOTHING BUT MANUAL REVIEW CAN ENSURE QUALITY OF CODE.
AUTHENTICATION ENSURES YOU READ THE RIGHT DIFFS.
IT DOES NOT REPLACE READING DIFFS.

A Monotone repository is a single file (an SQLite database)
which contains in compressed form, all of the project's
source code and history.

During the course of work, a Monotone repository
may come contain code which you aren't actively working with,
or even code which you don't entirely trust. This is normal.
For example, you may trust a repository which gave you code,
but not the author who committed it there.

When set up correctly (meaning: DO NOT skip sections 5.3 or 5.4)
Monotone evaluates whether it trusts the committer of code,
and prevents code from untrusted code from being checked out.

Code authentication happens not during syncs to repositories,
but when checking out or updating a working copy
from your local repository.

Commands exist which let you clean your repository
of untrusted code, but they are rarely needed,
if push access on the server is well regulated.

A repository can hold many branches. For example,
our repository holds the following main branches:

i2p.i2p -- the I2P router and associated programs
i2p.www -- the I2P project website
i2p.syndie -- Syndie, a distributed forums tool

For historical reasons, you may find other branches,
but they are not used. They originate from the import
of the CVS repository which was used before "dev.i2p" disappeared.

By convention, the I2P Monotone repository is named "i2p.mtn".
Before you pull source code from servers, you need to initialize
your own repository (it can become a new server if needed).

To initialize your local repository, change into a directory
where you want the "i2p.mtn" file and branch directories to appear,
and issue the following command:

mtn --db="i2p.mtn" db init



5.3. Obtaining and deploying developers' keys
==============================================

Keys which developers use to commit code are essential
for trust evaluation in Monotone. If you aren't running
a Monotone server, you don't need their transport keys.

Developers' commit keys are provided GPG-signed below.
Keys for zzz, Complication and welterde are provided clearsigned.
The key for jrandom must be verified differently, since he's away,
and only left a binary detached signature for his key.

To import developers' keys after verifying them,
copy them all into a single text file. Create this file
(e.g. "keys.txt") in the same directory where "i2p.mtn" is.
Import it by issuing:

cat keys.txt | mtn --db="i2p.mtn" read

Leave "/home/username/.monotone/keys" purely for your own keys.
Monotone doesn't like having duplicate keys in two places.
If you deploy other people's keys into that directory,
you will soon also have them in "i2p.mtn", and Monotone
will start reporting an error: "extraneous data in keystore".

IT WOULD BE INAPPROPRIATE TO SUPPLY ANYONE'S GPG PUBLIC KEYS
IN THIS GUIDE. FIND THE PUBLIC KEYS FROM AN INDEPENDENT SOURCE.
CURRENT DEVELOPERS HAVE THEIR GPG KEYS ON THEIR EEPSITES.
JRANDOM'S SYNDIE RELEASE KEY CAN BE FOUND ON A NUMBER
OF PUBLIC KEYSERVERS.

REMEMBER, TO SUCCESSFULLY EXTRACT CLEARSIGNED MESSAGES
AND ASCII-ARMOURED FILES FROM BELOW, YOU MUST MANUALLY REMOVE
THE "- " ESCAPE SEQUENCES FROM PGP "BEGIN" AND "END" LINES.



5.3.1. Monotone keys for Complication
======================================

Tip: to find Complication's GPG key, find from his eepsite
the key 0x79FCCE33, with the name "complication@mail.i2p"
and the fingerprint 73CF 2862 87A7 E7D2 19FF DB66 FA1D FC6B 79FC CE33.

- -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

I confirm that my Monotone commit and transport keys are:

[pubkey complication@mail.i2p]
MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUAA4GNADCBiQKBgQCx1F6nwBUCIiCPVsogy/h/+2d8X3uMcEdn
RIN+gxO+0pK+yrGZiFwi7TG/K3PjDfJWuxsPRKLeb9Q4NmfxrAePelGig9llalrDnRkIcRFu
cnNUOJo9C0MjvzYR9D6bIS3+udPdl6ou94JX+ueo2jLXI1lGgtdWDWTetJx9I++EvwIDAQAB
[end]
[pubkey complication-transport@mail.i2p]
MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUAA4GNADCBiQKBgQDP55FmBUIZjamtDinVDrLmS9uU40KoNfLd
iB+t/iEgEWHDPQxlwugh/aBQwsXKGGJMJSNURKwwjfrcr5y3oz9jpRjtLVqoZMBVLgp28WGA
9KbzXi4/dYhdyNmr4gHc17mDSlhCfk/L5QxifSYwSaeeFPsoAAyBBB221Z3197bmVQIDAQAB
[end]

Complication.
- -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQFHpdQT+h38a3n8zjMRAtW8AJ0fmuw1hrZePDzOx61xSh5cK27ikQCeJn+U
g8X/m/JAsedzOFJDN0tlTig=
=LM+C
- -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----



5.3.2. Monotone keys for zzz
=============================

Tip: to find zzz's GPG key, find from his eepsite
the key 0xA76E0BED, with the name "zzz@mail.i2p"
and the fingerprint 4456 EBBE C805 63FE 57E6 B310 4155 76BA A76E 0BED.

- -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

[pubkey zzz-transport@mail.i2p]
MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUAA4GNADCBiQKBgQDa2uZI1BobxS4TapMqmf4Ws3nyL3GYgkfb
MEawyWl0E1pfHJ4dLZkdxQdcLyCsN9OCY4jRNzmoYnDa2HtBLINq15BJmGJ0cfIDLXIB2GBO
ViAPRkEKQTVoc7IpcjtPPjtSBVganD/AW78m9cgUYag86Lbm2ynUaXWpw9i4gpLdLQIDAQAB
[end]
[pubkey zzz@mail.i2p]
MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUAA4GNADCBiQKBgQCtgaWY0Wc1c8pFGIxASZx78pHpHZKQV8z6
IRQkgy65gQMjpLquaQpy3Xk8rkpnfA+6h3TS6bjplsEhlaQoxvpGxacRYOt+y1HC/n20O3RI
E1A/e3sGKHGDEQW+3ItF4WSNfeQ18DzLeun32vFknq2k9im6Ts4tiYfKs8CZ5KW0/QIDAQAB
[end]
- -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQFHnN51QVV2uqduC+0RAv8NAJ9B/7pWKLvqVI6HnAifs9oedsdWSACfYS1E
sFwJiw4A+Sr9wQrtoO4X4ow=
=SVDV
- -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----



5.3.3. Monotone keys for welterde
==================================

Tip: to find welterde's GPG key, find on keyservers
the key 0x62E011A1, with the name "welterde@arcor.de"
and the fingerprint 6720 FD81 3872 6DFC 6016 64D1 EBBC 0374 62E0 11A1.

- -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

[pubkey dev@welterde.de]
MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUAA4GNADCBiQKBgQDRnJUBY0d4310UpZYGUlsWgxWHoD8bsKtT
vGw83vwUQRtM2xPKxCHvEntg9Dgiqr5RurOKHK7Eak6WgxCXQFfC9ALr4SoC5abI4ZFvM/CA
WRb547UIPTchSnuDUn/TSgDGqtGvMFS9t6OUp9Z/7QzIjLQhhBCqj4/hZhxUJ61XBwIDAQAB
[end]
[pubkey transport@welterde.de]
MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUAA4GNADCBiQKBgQCujyq15a7t0Gki/sKoZQbv7CHJWbT3YB5O
DQyU3zfqXnHNj82tz6wVsvjZmKUYZvax7wLLRErMGX3PTGxb23I5iypLmYtWt+lbkxMZdcGT
GEXBU8JnAfhnSIdLzBJ2soe55vBQp0Tx1Ta+7/CNYwVPUxr5l6J/2gcGFJg3cAD99wIDAQAB
[end]
- -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.7 (Darwin)

iD8DBQFHojoC67wDdGLgEaERAsALAKCwNlkNFaTyC4pV4rsinXQ8hu7UvgCbBeeV
Ni/uLlSdl3Kz7KfVipwnjm4=
=oE5t
- -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----



5.3.4. Monotone keys for jrandom
=================================

Tip: to find jrandom's GPG key for Syndie releases, find on keyservers
the key 0x393F2DF9, with the name "syndie-dist-key@i2p.net"
and the fingerprint AE89 D080 0E85 72F0 B777 B2ED C2FA 68C0 393F 2DF9.

Jrandom had to leave unexpectedly in the end of 2007.
His commit key was deployed in the Syndie Monotone repository,
in a file named "mtn-committers". That file also had a GPG signature,
"mtn-committers.sig", but it was a binary detached signature.
I am going to supply both files in GPG ASCII-armoured form below.

First the file "mtn-committers" containing jrandom's MTN key.
Save as "mtn-committers.asc" and unpack it using
"gpg --output mtn-committers --dearmor mtn-committers.asc".


- -----BEGIN PGP ARMORED FILE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Use "gpg --dearmor" for unpacking

W3B1YmtleSBqcmFuZG9tQGkycC5uZXRdCk1JR2ZNQTBHQ1NxR1NJYjNEUUVCQVFV
QUE0R05BRENCaVFLQmdRRE9MdzA1a1pidXg1S0xkcHJjR0hlQ1RseXQrR2poR1ho
NwpBdXBzK1FNRC9GRWJJVkVGUEdJQkcyanUzMDY5VEtJSHBYcjVIRWU1bWFCZ3RJ
SkJNOU5QVnZNTkZDZ09TcmVnbW5WSXB4U2cKSGQrV2l1MUl5emhkMFN4QzVwQ0hk
bndTanYwNTFmY3RZY3AxcnM1T2NVb2pVZHZGN3RxOTF6QUFZK2tMeHBYNnpRSURB
UUFCCltlbmRdCg==
=035X
- -----END PGP ARMORED FILE-----


Now the file "mtn-committers.sig", containing the GPG signature.
Save as "mtn-committers.sig.asc" and unpack it using
"gpg --output mtn-committers.sig --dearmor mtn-committers.sig.asc".
Use it to verify the above supplied "mtn-committers" file.


- -----BEGIN PGP ARMORED FILE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.6 (GNU/Linux)
Comment: Use "gpg --dearmor" for unpacking

iD8DBQBFLssNwvpowDk/LfkRAtytAKCOiaDIveC3sri0lrdvwxt/TQciigCfXgyC
ZY3qq910P/TX94qoJGePbuc=
=8NHt
- -----END PGP ARMORED FILE-----



5.4. Setting up trust evaluation hooks
=======================================

The default Monotone trust policy is way too lax:
it trusts every committer like bad old CVS. To operate in I2P,
you definitely want to change that.

Change into your "/home/username/.monotone" directory,
and open the file "monotonerc" with a text editor.
Copy and paste two functions into this file:

function intersection(a,b)
 local s={}
 local t={}
 for k,v in pairs(a) do s[v] = 1 end
 for k,v in pairs(b) do if s[v] ~= nil then table.insert(t,v) end end
 return t
end

function get_revision_cert_trust(signers, id, name, val)
 local trusted_signers = {
 "jrandom@i2p.net",
 "complication@mail.i2p",
 "zzz@mail.i2p",
 "dev@welterde.de"
 }
 local t = intersection(signers, trusted_signers)
 if t == nil then return false end
 if table.getn(t) >= 1 then return true end
 return false
end

Read the functions carefully to understand their purpose,
and compare them with sample functions and descriptions
provided in section 6.1.5 ("Trust evaluation hooks")
of the following document: http://monotone.ca/docs/Hooks.html

The first function determines an intersection between
two sets, in our case a revision's signers and trusted signers.

The second function determines trust in a given revision,
by calling the first function with "signers" and "trusted" as arguments.
If the intersection is null, the revision is not trusted.
If the intersection is not empty, the revision is trusted.
Otherwise, the revision is not trusted.



5.5. About servers, and creating a client tunnel to "mtn.i2p2.i2p"
===================================================================

First, you need to choose a server.
Some I2P developers run accessible Monotone servers,
but when developers are anonymous, their servers are VERY SLOW.

When you set up Monotone correctly, code will be authenticated
by developers' commit keys, so you should be able to safely use
a public Monotone server despite risk of someone subverting it.

For this reason, you are recommended to pull sources
and sync your code contributions using our public MTN server.
It is named "mtn.i2p2.i2p" inside I2P, or "mtn.i2p2.de"
on the ordinary Internet. It is operated by "welterde".
I will only provide instructions for accessing it over I2P.

First, you need the I2P destination key of the server.
When I wrote this transition guide, its key was not yet included
in an I2P installation (in the future it will be).
The destination key of "mtn.i2p2.i2p" is:

G6VmsrLYbdcxBq585OUcQn7wbwC7J5jfXDWWL6lPBw5iq68VxqxibraiPwwF6NM2
aHV8BkqyCKYSL9fUuYWoeUc1zL~2l1DX2x~LfyItGJKDIUGImWQivXF1w7EGYMhj
q4UCmPKTsnl4G86oKW8PGaaF8mzjjUKW1R7G7941my~mnbeTrhjlLgaMK-tauVod
gTPIYkxfMJaq3zWuirztuUgDcXXIbkpzaA2Iben0VqbjbMJisj4fFh0EvqNkYAG5
4YBc26~W6SPWyBgZilXvFlcizF90Q5NkIGMMHXTq46qEYHkpQC3CoaH6PMNVDetD
PmFc3QXmc68cNcj~VPh4XVsn3qiKhXuRdXggEC3RoTcxqaeassfIG5xhRdnJzGSV
hYUE3At~8wI-AuRV~AglV1Q-AZTWT~9VxBzcxfI1PpfzeA-5z5T4542bh1e-RM9t
zXEx5ErPCt6M~zJ2~4-tz-aBsZEhBkn0iDi8pazshg6lTl1~hCnueZBxYICqPrlB
AAAA

If you want to copy it from here, you need to manually join
the lines back together in a text editor. Sorry, I could not
GPG-sign that very long line.

To address this destination using a convenient name,
you need to enter it into the host database of your I2P router.
This can be done manually by editing the "hosts.txt" file,
or more easily using the "SusiDNS" tool:

* open SusiDNS ( http://localhost:7657/susidns/index.jsp )
* open the router addressbook
* find the "Add new destination:" part at the bottom
* enter "mtn.i2p2.i2p" into the "Hostname" box
* enter the key into the "Destination:" box
* click "Add destination"

Next, you need to create a client tunnel pointing at the server.
This can be done manually by editing "i2ptunnel.config"
or more easily using the "I2PTunnel" tool:

* open I2PTunnel ( http://localhost:7657/i2ptunnel/index.jsp )
* find the "Add new client tunnel:" part at the middle
* pick "Standard" for the tunnel type, click "Create"
* enter "mtn.i2p2.i2p" in the "Name:" box
* enter "mtn.i2p2.i2p" in the "Description:" box
* enter "8998" in the "Access Point Port:" box
* select "Bulk connection" in the "Profile" box
* enable the "Shared client" checkbox
* enable the "Auto start" checkbox
* pick your anonymity level at the bottom
* click "Save"
* the tunnel will start automatically



5.6. Pulling the "i2p.i2p", "i2p.www" and "i2p.syndie" branches
================================================================

When you pull code as a client, the action itself implies
that you want data from the server. You thus don't need
to grant the server any extra permissions.

Enter the directory where you initialized "i2p.mtn".
Depending on whether you want only I2P sources, or also sources
for the I2P website and Syndie, you can perform the "pull" operation
in different ways.

If you only want I2P sources:
mtn --db="i2p.mtn" pull 127.0.0.1:8998 i2p.i2p

If you want all branches:
mtn --db="i2p.mtn" pull 127.0.0.1:8998 "i2p.*"

Restart the process if it stops due to network errors.
Note how pulling in the above examples is anonymous
(doesn't use your transport key). There is a reason for this:
when everyone pulls anonymously, it is harder for an attacker
who gains control of the server, to selectively provide some people
with tampered data. It is therefore advised to pull anonymously.



5.7. Verifying that trust evaluation works
===========================================

To verify that trust evaluation works,
modify your "monotonerc" file in the following way:

- - local trusted_signers = {
- - "jrandom@i2p.net",
- - "complication@mail.i2p",
- - "zzz@mail.i2p",
- - "dev@welterde.de"
- - }

+ local trusted_signers = {
+ }

Save the file, and your Monotone stops trusting all committers.
Change into the directory where you created "i2p.mtn",
and attempt a checkout of the I2P branch like this:

mtn --db="i2p.mtn" co --branch="i2p.i2p"

A directory named "i2p.i2p" should NOT appear.
You should encounter great numbers of error messages like:

mtn: warning: trust function disliked 1 signers
of branch cert on revision 523c15f6f50cad3bb002f830111fc189732f693b
mtn: warning: trust function disliked 1 signers
of branch cert on revision 8ac13edc2919dbd5bb596ed9f203aa780bf23ff0
mtn: warning: trust function disliked 1 signers
of branch cert on revision 8c4dd8ad4053baabb102a01cd3f91278142a2cd1
mtn: misuse: branch 'i2p.i2p' is empty

If you are satisfied with results, change your "monotonerc" back
to match section 5.4.



5.8. Verifying that I2P maintains continuity with jrandom's last tarball
=========================================================================

When jrandom had to leave, and soon after that dev.i2p went down,
other developers and server operators (e.g. Complication, zzz, welterde)
had to take over his job.

It is important for the I2P project's trustability,
that practical and widely known methods exist for verifying
that code integrity was preserved. Perhaps the most important part
in this, is ability to verify the initial import into Monotone by zzz.

Fortunately the 0.6.1.30 source tarball, signed by jrandom,
should make verification fairly simple. I will describe
the recommended course of action below.



5.8.1. Obtaining jrandom's public GPG key
==========================================

IT WOULD BE INAPPROPRIATE TO SUPPLY JRANDOM'S GPG PUBLIC KEY
IN THIS GUIDE. FIND THE PUBLIC KEY FROM AN INDEPENDENT SOURCE.
JRANDOM'S GPG PUBLIC KEY CAN BE FOUND IN MANY PLACES,
INCLUDING A NUMBER OF PUBLIC KEYSERVERS.

Tip: to find jrandom's GPG key for I2P releases,
find on keyservers the key 0x065E37EE, with the name "jrandom@i2p.net"
and the fingerprint 829E F1C6 89A5 72DC E66F D5BF 42E2 7451 065E 37EE.



5.8.2. Obtaining the 0.6.1.30 source tarball and jrandom's signature of it
===========================================================================

There are multiple places where you can find the 0.6.1.30 source tarball
and signature. I will provide two, and recommend the first one,
since it's massively faster.

http://mirror.i2p2.de/i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2
http://mirror.i2p2.de/i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2.sig

http://complication.i2p/i2p/0.6.1.30/i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2
http://complication.i2p/i2p/0.6.1.30/i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2.sig



5.8.3. Verifying and extracting the source tarball
===================================================

Deploy the tarball and signature into the directory where "i2p.mtn" is.
Assuming you have jrandom's GPG key imported into your GPG keyring,
verify the tarball this way:

gpg --verify i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2.sig i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2

Extract the tarball into a source tree like below,
and a directory named "i2p_0_6_1_30" should appear.

tar -xjvf i2p-0.6.1.30.tar.bz2



5.8.4. Checking out 0.6.1.30 sources from Monotone
===================================================

To compare code in Monotone against the source tarball,
we must check out the revision which corresponds to 0.6.1.30
from Monotone.

That revision is "928aadc3796083b8412829c2d18e95fdeecd8196".
To check it out, change into the directory where "i2p.mtn"
is located, and over there issue:

mtn --db="i2p.mtn" co --revision="928aadc3796083b8412829c2d18e95fdeecd8196"

A directory named "i2p.i2p" must appear in the current directory.
You may notice that it contains a subdirectory named "_MTN",
which the source tarball does not contain.

That subdirectory is for Monotone internal use. We'll ignore it
while diffing. To ascertain that the extra directory is safe,
you can perform a few checks:

* check Monotone docs to ascertain that it must exist
* ascertain that nothing in I2P code uses it
* examine its content



5.8.5. Diffing source trees against each other
===============================================

To perform a recursive (-r) diff of the source tarball
against the Monotone checkout, writing output into "result.diff",
treating absent files and directories as empty (-N) for comparison, 
and excluding (-x) any "_MTN" subdirectories, you should issue:

diff -r -N -x "_MTN" i2p_0_6_1_30 i2p.i2p > changes.diff

You should read "changes.diff" with a text editor. Your work
will be easier if your text editor highlights diff syntax,
but that is optional. The only kind of changes you should see are:

a) changes of CVS "$Id:" tags into empty tags, like below:

< $Id: readme.license.txt,v 1.1.1.1 2004-04-07 23:41:55 jrandom Exp $
> $Id$

b) changes of date format in CVS "$Id:" tags, like below:

< $Id: README,v 1.1 2005-01-24 18:43:38 smeghead Exp $
> $Id: README,v 1.1 2005/01/24 17:42:05 smeghead Exp $

c) revision number hops without changes in file content, like below:

<  * $Revision: 1.2 $
>  * $Revision: 1.1 $

d) changes in date tags, presumably part of the release process

< <i2p.news date="$Date: 2007-10-07 22:09:35 $">
> <i2p.news date="$Date: 2007-08-23 19:33:29 $">

That should be all. The diff ought be about 300 lines long.
There should be absolutely no changes in anything but formal tags.
If you see consequential changes in code, please report.



5.8.6. Examining changes from 0.6.1.30 onwards
===============================================

To examine what has been modified from the current moment
back to release 0.6.1.30, use ordinary Monotone facilities.
For example you could change into the "i2p.i2p" directory
and there issue:

mtn update

mtn log --to="928aadc3796083b8412829c2d18e95fdeecd8196" > ../changes.log

mtn diff --revision="928aadc3796083b8412829c2d18e95fdeecd8196" > ../changes.diff

The first command would update your local copy to the "head"
or latest version. The second one would print a concise log of changes
going back to 0.6.1.30, into a file in the parent directory
of the working copy, and the third command would print a full diff
into another file.

This diff will be BIG, and will get bigger with development.
Fortunately there are compelling reasons to read it
only during a short period after the transition.



5.9. Checking out a working copy of the latest version
=======================================================

Do this only if you haven't already checked out a working copy.
If you checked it out according to section 5.8.4, skip to 5.10
and do an update instead.

Change into the directory where "i2p.mtn" is located.
Over there issue:

mtn --db="i2p.mtn" co --branch="i2p.i2p"

Checkout should complete without error messages, and a directory
named "i2p.i2p" should appear in the current directory.
Congratulations, you have successfully checked out
the latest I2P sources. They should be ready to compile.



5.10. Updating your working copy to the latest version
=======================================================

If you haven't done this already, pull fresh code from the server
to your local Monotone repository. To accomplish this, change into
the directory where "i2p.mtn" is located and issue:

mtn --db="i2p.mtn" pull 127.0.0.1:8998 i2p.i2p

Now change into your "i2p.i2p" directory,
and over there issue:

mtn update

Congratulations, you have successfully updated to
the latest I2P sources. They should be ready to compile.



5.11. Why "i2p.www" cannot be verified
=======================================

The branch "www.i2p" cannot be properly verified,
because jrandom did not produce signed tarballs of it.

Fortunately, only a few people need the project website,
and it's small enough to review manually in a modest period of time.
I thus hope it's not a risk which comes to bite us back.

Changes which occur in this branch since its import into Monotone,
will be verifiable in future.



5.12. Why Syndie doesn't need a signed tarball to verify
=========================================================

Because it was verified using jrandom's MTN key.

If you obtained the "mtn-committers" and "mtn-committers.sig"
files from this guide, and obtained jrandom's Syndie release key
from an independent source, and the signature verified,
one of the following should be true:

a) the MTN key this document supplies is correct
b) your indepedent source is colluding with me

However if the signed tarball should become available,
this document will be updated with information about it.



6. Operating a server
======================



6.1. Obtaining and deploying developers' transport keys
========================================================

Since a server's purpose is being a place of exchange,
you probably want to have developers' transport keys,
and provide them push access.

If multiple servers are operated in parallel,
you may also want to grant other servers push access.
Servers also have transport keys, just ask for them
from the server operators.

Importing transport keys goes identically
to importing commit keys, described in section 5.5.



6.2. Regulating push and pull access on a server
=================================================

When you just start a Monotone server, it will deny all access.
Since that's pretty boring, you'll probably want to:

* allow everyone pull access
* allow developers push access

To permit everyone pull access, open the file
"/home/username/.monotone/read-permissions" and
add lines like the following two:

pattern "*"
allow "*"

To permit developers push access, open the file
"/home/username/.monotone/write-permissions" and
add lines like the following two:

zzz-transport@mail.i2p
complication-transport@mail.i2p



6.3. Running Monotone in server mode
============================================

First, to run a Monotone server, don't use your development database.
Monotone locks a database while serving it to others,
and this will greatly inconvenience your development work.

Instead make a copy of your development database,
possibly into a different directory, possibly for a different user
(your choice) and finally in the right directory, as the right user
issue something like:

mtn serve --bind="127.0.0.1:8998" --db="i2p.mtn" --key "myserver-transport@mail.i2p"

If your key is protected with a passphrase, Monotone may request
the passphrase not during startup, but when the first client connects.
This is probably a bug in Monotone, and will be fixed.
You can get around this effect by connecting as a client
to your own server.

For your server to be accessible for others over I2P,
you will need to create a server tunnel for it.
Use the "Standard" tunnel type and "Bulk" profile.



6.4. Differences under Debian GNU/Linux
========================================

Some Linux distros have taken an extra step and integrated Monotone
into their framework of daemons/services. Debian is among them,
even though you can run Monotone "the ordinary way"
under Debian too.

You can find the "read-permissions", "write-permissions"
and "hooks.lua" file under "/etc/monotone".

You'll likely need to modify "/etc/default/monotone",
since it contains settings like the interface to listen on,
and the location of data files ("i2p.mtn").

A script "/etc/init.d/monotone" is provided for running a Monotone server.
You can register it for running automatically using "update-rc.d".

When more information becomes available, it will be added here.
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